iPhone Video – Playing Around with Slow Motion and Video Editing on the iPhone

I got my new iPhone 6s Plus and the first thing I wanted to do was film some things in slow motion. The car hood worked the best. You intuitively know how quickly a car hood should fall, so you instantly recognize the video is in slow motion. The loud noise is a bonus.

This is the first video I’ve made entirely on the iPhone. I used Apple’s free iMovie app to trim it, convert it to black and white, and add a title and background music.

That’s admittedly really basic video editing, but as an Adobe Premiere snob it was an eye-opener that I could do it on the phone and do it so quickly. The whole process from shooting to editing to publishing took about 20 minutes. Now I understand that doing everything on the iPhone could speed up video creation dramatically. I’ve downloaded some other video editors to explore this some more.

PreviouslyiPhone Video – My First Time Using an iPhone Instead of a DSLR for Club Video

iPhone Video – My First Time Using an iPhone Instead of a DSLR for Club Video

I’ve been shooting video with a DSLR for about five years. A while back I realized that iPhone video was pretty darned good, so I decided to try using an iPhone as a second camera. Then I could mix the DSLR footage and iPhone footage in my video editing software and have multiple camera angles. Heck, maybe I could even leave the heavy DSRL gear behind and use a system built around smartphones.

iPhone Video

The video quality for the Labron Lazenby video was OK considering, in this case considering this was a dark club. If you play the video fullscreen it’s easy to see the noise and grain in the video. Smartphone cameras have small sensors. (The sensor is the chip that converts light into electrical signals.) Small sensors don’t perform as well in low light as the large sensors in DSLRs. Advantage – DSLR.

For the sake of comparison, here is a different show I shot in daylight with my wife’s iPhone 6. With plenty of light, there’s no grain or noise.

Lenses

One big advantage of DSLRs is their interchangeable lenses. To close the gap I bought an Olloclip 4-in-1 lens that fits over the iPhone’s lens. It combines a wideangle, fisheye, and two levels of macro in one unit. I used the fisheye for this video and liked the different look. I’ve wanted a fisheye lens forever, but couldn’t justify $800 for the Nikon or $240 for the Rokinon. I was happy to pay $70 for the Olloclip. I’m finding that iPhone gear is cheap compared to the DSLR equivalents.

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